Thursday, July 7, 2016

Machine Learning In Manufacturing

Machine learning is and will become very significant not only in everyday life, but specifically in manufacturing. In 2017, we will see machine learning in manufacturing in a very significant way.

Here is a very interesting article by in The Washington Post titled:

The amazing artificial intelligence we were promised is coming, finally

"The AI of the past used brute-force computing to analyze data and present them in a way that seemed human.  The programmer supplied the intelligence in the form of decision trees and algorithms.  Imagine that you were trying to build a machine that could play tic-tac-toe. You would give it specific rules on what move to make, and it would follow them. That is essentially how IBM’s Big Blue computer beat chess Grandmaster Garry Kasparov in 1997, by using a supercomputer to calculate every possible move faster than he could.

Today’s AI uses machine learning in which you give it examples of previous games and let it learn from those examples. The computer is taught what to learn and how to learn and makes its own decisions.  What’s more, the new AIs are modeling the human mind itself using techniques similar to our learning processes.  Before, it could take millions of lines of computer code to perform tasks such as handwriting recognition. Now it can be done in hundreds of lines. What is required is a large number of examples so that the computer can teach itself."

I really like the point that Kevin Kelly brings out in the article:  

"AI has applications in every area in which data are processed and decisions required. Wired founding editor Kevin Kelly likened AI to electricity: a cheap, reliable, industrial-grade digital smartness running behind everything.  He said that it “will enliven inert objects, much as electricity did more than a century ago. Everything that we formerly electrified we will now ‘cognitize.’ This new utilitarian AI will also augment us individually as people (deepening our memory, speeding our recognition) and collectively as a species. There is almost nothing we can think of that cannot be made new, different, or interesting by infusing it with some extra IQ.  In fact, the business plans of the next 10,000 start-ups are easy to forecast: Take X and add AI. This is a big deal, and now it’s here.”

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